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Stuck at Home (together)

Words Matter

Discover the Power of Prose & Poetry

Now that you have an extra hour or two in your day when you’re NOT commuting: what are you going to do with that time? Here’s an idea: Connect through words. Get your thoughts out on paper or soak in the those of other writers.

Journaling to Connect

If you don’t normally write in a journal, try it out for the next week. Any old notebook will do. And if you don’t have one, fold three pieces of paper in half, nest them together, staple the center fold. Voila! You have a 10-pg journal.

To get started, here are a few prompts to consider as you prime the pump:

 

  • How are you feeling (emotionally, physically, mentally)?

  • What are you grateful for even if you’re “stuck at home?”

  • If you could give advice to the world on how to handle this pandemic, what would you suggest?

How does writing support your health?

There’s evidence that journaling can have a positive impact on our physical well-being. University of Texas at Austin psychologist and researcher, James Pennebaker contends that regular journaling strengthens immune cells at the same time it reduces the impact of stressful events on your physical health.

Soak in the Words of Others

Remember to read. Not just the news. Read a novel, or a mystery. Or read science fiction or a young adult series.

We will be sharing different selections of creative writing that we think might be food for thought. Please read and share your thoughts!

Today, like every other day, we wake up empty
and frightened. Don’t open the door to the study
and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument.
Let the beauty we love be what we do.
There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground
Rumi – 13th Century Persian Poet

What did the above make you think about? Let us know in the comments below.

 

Why is reading good for us?

“Books trigger greater brain activity than television as it encourages the act of visualization. It also extends higher-order thinking needed for problem solving. Literature builds empathy and respect for others, as well as provides comfort. (see this New York Times article). Read historical fiction or history to gain some perspective on what we’re experiencing. You’ll be surprised by the parallels you will find.

4 Comments

  1. Susan E

    On public media, they talk endlessly about the reopening of hair shops, drive-ins, golf courses, state parks, historical sites, car washes, dealerships, fitness classes and retail shops.

    I have spent countless hours trying to find out when the PUBLIC LIBRARIES will reopen in the area where I live and no one will answer my question!

    I have also tried to find out when the savings banks and brokerage offices will open their doors again and no one seems to know.

    Why are the hair saloons so much more important than the banks and public libraries?

    Why are the banks and libraries not mentioned on any public lists of what will reopen?

    Reply
  2. Mariama Walker

    Self preservation is the first law of nature. Primary is to research, learn and master the love of thyself, only then can you extend true love to everyone else. Mariama A. Walker

    Reply
  3. lihobson

    Create in my own way and watch the beauty that comes from it. Be fulfilled and filled.

    Reply

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7 Books to Inspire Creativity

Need a little jumpstart for your imagination? Here’s our team’s top 7 recommended “classics” that will spark your creativity. Enjoy as you discover lots of new ways express yourself!

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Special Thanks

The Stuck at Home (together) initiative is partially funded through the generous support of:

The mission of the Foundation for Art & Healing is to promote creative arts expression as a means to improve health and well-being for individuals and communities. Our signature program, The UnLonely Project, broadens public awareness of the negative physical and mental health consequences of loneliness associated with a wide range of living conditions and circumstances while also exploring and promoting creative arts-based approaches to reduce the burden. 

The content on this site is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical or mental health condition.